OTT & Multiscreen • Developing OTT for the Emerging Markets, I

Graphic - Digital Trends Video Opinions (header #2, web)

 

Back in 1998, when I worked for Motorola, the company invited staff to join a corporate briefing on the status and future of the company. I was based in Prague at the time, and this was the first call of its type that I had the privilege of attending. There were literally thousands of people on this call, representing countries from around the world. After listening to our corporate executives talk about their vision of the future, one of the senior executives said something that caught my attention. He said (I’m paraphrasing as it’s been a while), “We plan to give special attention to emerging markets. We see a lot of opportunities in these regions and want to capitalize on their rapid growth potential. Specifically, we see states such as Idaho as an emerging market and we want to focus some of our efforts there…”

What? Idaho, an emerging market? Suddenly the reality of my role, working out of the humble Prague office located on the other side of the world, slapped me in the face. Even though I was responsible for marketing across over 25 countries in Central & Eastern Europe, it seemed that we weren’t even on HQ’s geographic radar.

I would like to provide some perspective on what are the true emerging markets in the entertainment industry – specifically in regards to video streaming. Fifteen years have passed since that call, and much of my time has been spent with one leg in western markets and the other in emerging markets. Holding dual citizenship as a Canadian and Slovak, I always felt I had solid footing in both cultures.

Figure i – Global Internet Traffic vs. Digital Video Milestones

Figure i – Global Internet Traffic vs. Digital Video Milestones, Sources: Cisco & Wikipedia

Digital video has arrived in a big way and is maturing rapidly across the globe[i]. Figure i shows the accelerated growth of internet traffic, of which approximately 70% will be video by 2016 according to Cisco’s VNI[ii] report. For nearly a decade consumers have enjoyed video streaming on their computers and more recently on their mobile devices. Even though this change occurred quickly, it has also been taken for granted. We expect high quality video streaming; that our Skype calls will work; we even assume that video will be served to our mobile devices. So, here is a quick reminder of what we didn’t have ten years ago:

  • We didn’t have YouTube, which launched in February 2005[iii].
  • Consumers were still calling long distance – Skype launched on the 29th of August 2003[iv] and reached its first 10 million concurrent users in 2007[v]
  • Blu-Ray discs had yet to be introduced, with the first titles being released on the 20th of June 2006[vi]
  • Even the iPhone began shipping as early as six years ago, on the 29th of June 2007[vii]

These products and services have become so essential to our lives it’s as if we’ve had them forever. But not everyone around the world has been enjoying entertainment at an even pace.

Information Communication Technology (ICT) maturity varies greatly outside of the developed market. The availability and quality of video streaming, communications, and mobility fluctuates depending on a given developing region. For example, the past decade has shown that the USA leads in the adoption of streaming video solutions, including its offspring Over the Top Content (OTT). Several of the first movers in OTT services who entered the market include Brightcove (est. 2004), Ooyala (est. 2007), and Kaltura (est. 2006). In addition, western subscribers consume more digital video than any other region around the work – in excess of 45GB of traffic per month. In fact, according to the latest report from Sandvine[viii], 32% of downstream traffic in the USA in 2013 can be attributed to Netflix alone. But in Europe, Canada and parts of Asia, these second-tier regions trail several years behind the USA in the adoption of OTT and video streaming services (Figure ii). European consumers, for example, consume a third of traffic compared to their American counterparts: 13GB per month. This is partially attributed to the limited supply of OTT services outside the United States.

Figure ii - OTT Evolution - Geographic Distribution

Figure ii – OTT Evolution – Geographic Distribution

The third tier in this assessment is that of emerging markets. These regions are at least four years behind the USA. This lag is significant on several fronts. First of all, from a competitive perspective, as the Internet is borderless, western companies are entering emerging markets before the local players have the knowledge, time or capital to build a service themselves. Secondly, early adopters from the west have first-move advantage to create an early footprint of global subscribers since they already have a platform and seed capital to expand to international markets. Western competitors wanting to establish a larger subscriber footprint in the east secure additional capital to buy expensive premium content. This footprint is easier to extend over the Internet where borders can be easily crossed. In contrast, broadcasters are typically restricted by geography due to regulation and the limitations of their physical infrastructure.

Stay Tuned for Part II

In the second part of this article we will look into several areas where OTT deployments in the emerging markets differ from developed markets.

• Synopsis

In the digital era of the 21st century, ‘emerging markets’ have evolved into what we now call ‘developing markets’. If companies in the west are considered the adults of the business world, then developing markets are still at the adolescent stage. A developing market at least acknowledges that the emerging markets have entered their next growth phase. As digital video and entertainment proliferates around the world, the tide is not rising for everyone at the same pace. Developing markets still have to overcome obstacles in adopting streaming solutions due to cultural, technological, and financial challenges. This article has taken a look at some of the differences between developed and developing markets in the adoption of Over the Top solutions (OTT) and digital streaming. By examining some of these, we can help them mature into healthy and robust teenagers.

• About Gabriel Dusil

Ÿ• Home - Signature, Gabriel Dusil ('12, shadow, teal)Gabriel Dusil was recently the Chief Marketing & Corporate Strategy Officer at Visual Unity Global, and a member of the core management team that secured 7.2m US$ in series “A” funding for the company in 2014. Before joining Visual Unity, Gabriel was the VP of Sales & Marketing at Cognitive Security, and Director of Alliances at SecureWorks, responsible for partners in Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA). Previously, Gabriel worked at VeriSign & Motorola in a combination of senior marketing & sales roles. Gabriel obtained a degree in Engineering Physics from McMaster University in Canada and has advanced knowledge in Online Video Solutions, Cloud Computing, Security as a Service (SaaS), Identity & Access Management (IAM), and Managed Security Services (MSS).

• Tags

Ÿ4K, Broadcast, Connected TV, Digital Rights, Digital Video, DRM, Gabriel Dusil, H.265, HEVC, Internet Piracy, Internet Video, Linear Broadcast, Linear TV, Multi-screen, Multiscreen, New Media, Online Video, Online Video Platform, OTT, Over the Top Content, OVP, Recommendation Engine, Search & Discovery, Search and Discovery, second screen, Smart TV, Social TV, TV Everywhere, Ultra HD, Ultra High Definition, Visual Unity, emerging markets, developing markets, developed markets.

• References

[i] Internet Traffic, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_traffic & Cisco’s Visual Networking Index Forecast (’13)

[ii] Cisco, Visual Networking Index (VNI), http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/service-provider/visual-networking-index-vni/index.html

[iii] YouTube, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Youtube

[iv] Skype, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skype

[v] 50 million concurrent users online!, by Jean Mercier, http://skypenumerology.blogspot.cz/2013/01/50-million-concurrent-users-online.html

[vi] Blu-Ray, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blu-ray

[vii] Apple iPhone, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPhone

[viii] Sandvine – Global Internet Phenomena Report (1H ‘13)

[ix] HTML5, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML5

[x] Responsive Web Design, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Responsive_web_design

[xi] “Sub-Saharan Africa pay-TV numbers to double by 2020”, by Jim O’Neill, Ooyala VideoMind, http://videomind.ooyala.com/blog/sub-saharan-africa-pay-tv-numbers-double-2020

[xii] A similar trend occurred in the payment industry over the years. Markets that introduced a check-based payment system in the 80’s migrated to credit cards in the 90’s and then to debit cards in the 00’s. In the USA, where checks were introduced, that method of payment is still used to this day. But markets in Europe that missed the boat with checks flourished with credit cards. Emerging markets, on the other hand, missed the boat with credit cards and went straight to debit cards. Furthermore, many of the smaller emerging markets still remain a cash-based purchasing society.

[xiii] Average revenue per user, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Average_revenue_per_user

[xiv] “Pay-TV Prices Are at the Breaking Point — And They’re Only Going to Get Worse”, by Todd Spangler, Variety.com, http://variety.com/2013/biz/news/pay-tv-prices-are-at-the-breaking-point-and-theyre-only-going-to-get-worse-1200886691/

[xv] Trading Analog Dollars For Digital Pennies, by Zemanta, http://avc.com/2008/11/trading-analog/

[xvi] Consolidated figures for Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_households, Ofcom, and iDate, http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/market-data-research/market-data/communications-market-reports/cmr13/international/icmr-3.23

OTT & Multiscreen • Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society • 1-7 • Complete Series

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (title)

In this post you get access to all seven white papers from this Q&A series on Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society. You also get one-click access to each original post. Enjoy!

• Synopsis

•  Understanding the entertainment market from ten thousand meters helps industry executives make strategic decisions. This leads to tactical initiatives that drive innovation, new services, and revenue growth. This Q&A series takes a top level view of today’s digital landscape and helps decision makers navigate through the latest technologies and trends in digital video. Gabriel Dusil, Chief Marketing & Corporate Strategy Officer from Visual Unity, discusses the ongoing developments in Over the Top (OTT) services, how these platforms are helping to shape today’s digital society, and addresses the evolving changes in consumer behavior. Topics include 2nd Screen, 4K Ultra High Definition video, H.265 HEVC, global challenges surrounding content distribution, and the future of OTT.

• Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society – Q&A Series

1. Is 2nd Screen a threat to broadcasters? What are the challenges for OTT moving forward?

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (part i, thumbnail)

 

2. How will 4K be adopted by consumers?

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (part ii, thumbnail)

 

3. Is there a future for 4K video in broadcast?

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (part iii, thumbnail)

 

4. How is OTT evolving, and what’s in store for subscribers?

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (part iv, thumbnail)

 

5. How is digital video affecting global communications?

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (part v, thumbnail)

 

6. Transcoding Challenges with H.265 HEVC & 4K UHD.

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (part vi, thumbnail)

7. What are some improvements that OTT can offer to Online Entertainment Services?

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (part vii, thumbnail)

• Tags

• 2nd Screen, 4K, Broadcast, Connected TV, Digital Rights, Digital Video, DRM, Entertainment, Gabriel Dusil, H.264, H.265, HEVC, Internet Video, Linear Broadcast, Linear TV, Multi screen, Multiscreen, New Media, Online Video, Online Video Platform, OTT, Over the Top Content, OVP, Recommendation Engine, Search Discovery, second screen, Smart TV, Social TV, TV Everywhere, Television, UHD, Ultra HD, Ultra High Definition, Video Streaming, Visual Unity Global

Family • Photo Restoration • 1 • Mamička • 2014 October

Family Photo Restoration • Mamička

• In my last visit home, to Burlington, Ontario, Canada, I decided to digitally scan a selection of old family photos.  My wish is that one day, my boys and their offspring will have a high quality digital library of their family heritage. This is part of an ongoing pursuit to establish an archive of our family history, and build on the depth of work that my Mom has done with our family genealogy.  My wish is that generations that follow us, will enjoy the the efforts that we made in the preservation of their family history.  I hope to scan more photos on my next visit.  So this is just a start.

• Each month I plan to post a selection of new photos that have been restored. I also wanted to record the restoration process, so that you can see the tedious process needed to achieve a near perfect restoration. I suggest viewing the videos in high definition and in full screen (both options can be selected, using the bottom right icons in the YouTube player). Enjoy.

 Happy Birthda Mamička 

I love you,

Home - Signature, Gabriel Dusil ('12, shadow, teal, Gab)

A Note to Family & Friends

• All photos in this blog can be downloaded by just clicking on them – the images will open in a new tab in your browser, where you can then right click on them and save the file to your computer.  If you want an even higher quality version (to print, for example) then let me know, as I have the original uncompressed Tiffs.

• If you have anecdotal information related to any photos in this blog, then please send me the details, and I would be happy to add your postscript below the photos.  Just send me an email or post your comments at the end of this blog.

 

• 1962 • Keszthely, Hungary • Eva Kendeova

 • 3 minutes 3 seconds

62 - Keszthely · Eva Kendeova (restored)

62 – Keszthely · Eva Kendeova (restored)

 

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • This photo was taken in Keszthely, Hungary in 1961, I was 16 years old. My Mom and I were at my grandmothers, where we visited every second year.

 

• 1962 • Košice, Slovakia • Eva, Attila & Csaba Kende

3 minutes 56 seconds

61 - Kosice · Eva, Attila & Csaba Kende (restored)

61 – Kosice · Eva, Attila & Csaba Kende (restored)

 

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • On my right is my brother, Attila in military uniform, 23 years old, I’m 16 years old, and my other brother, Csaba (28 years old) is on my left, photographed at my parents apartment, Krmanova 3, Kosice, Slovakia.

 

• 1964 • Spišská Nová Ves, Slovakia • Eva Kendeova

2 minutes 50 seconds

64 - Spišská Nová Ves • Eva Kendeova (restored)

64 – Spišská Nová Ves • Eva Kendeova (restored)

 

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • This photo was taken in Spišská Nová Ves, Slovakia, where there was a horseback jumping competition. On this occasion I was attending as a spectator, although my club was taking part in it.  •  Since my mother was born there, I used the opportunity to visit the villa she grew up in, where I spent a happy childhood. Beside the villa was the Haltenberger Textile factory that her grandparents owned in the 1920’s. This textile factory eventually was abandoned and in bad shape, and the business was sold by mother’s uncle Rudolf Haltenberger Jr., to Budapest around 1921-1922.  •  In this photo I am 19 years old. I am wearing a top which was very fashionable at that time.

• Postscript from me • September 2014 • I love this photo so much.  It’s currently my favorite photo of my Mom, from before we emigrated.  She is so beautiful… and still is!

 

• 1964 March 8 • Košice, Slovakia • International Woman’s Day • Eva & Valeria Kendeova

4 minutes 45 seconds

64.Mar.8 - Kosice · Eva & Valeria Kendeova (Woman's Day, restored)

64.Mar.8 – Kosice · Eva & Valeria Kendeova (Woman’s Day, restored)

 

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • Here I am about 18 years old.  My mother and I were attending an International Women’s Day celebration at my Mom’s workplace.

• Postscript from me • September 2014 • It’s rare to find a photo of my grandmother where she is smiling. I think this is the best one I found, so far.  I really love the emotion in this photo. You can see the happiness in her eyes, and how my mom is also enjoying the moment.

 

• 1965 July • Keszthely, Hungary • Eva Kendeova • Jumping with a Furioso horse

 • 5 minutes 17 seconds

65.July - Keszthely · Eva Kendeova (Jumping with Furioso horse, restored)

65.July – Keszthely · Eva Kendeova (Jumping with Furioso horse, restored)

 

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • In this photo I am 20 years young. My Mom and I were visiting my grandmother in Keszthely, Hungary, during the summer holidays. Every time we visited, I would ride at the local stud farm. Here I am jumping the trainer’s stud. He was a really powerful horse, and a beautiful animal, from the Furioso breed.  They liked when I visited, and eventually I took part in a competition for them. Later on I represented them at a horse pageant, at a different location.

• Postscript from me • September 2014 • We often hear our parents say that they did ‘this and that’, when they were young.  As kids we don’t know the true extent of their accomplishments until we are old enough to appreciate them.  Memories may fade with time, but these photos will (hopefully) last forever. My mom was an accomplished horseback rider.  This is a great photograph of her in action.

 

• 1966 • Tatra Mountains, Slovakia • Eva Kendeova

 • 2 minutes 23 seconds

66 - Tatra · Eva Kendeova (restored #b)

66 – Tatra · Eva Kendeova (restored #b)

 

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • This photo is from a ski expedition we had in the Tatra mountains, organized by my university. I was in my first year of veterinary college.

 

• 1967 • Poprad, Slovakia • Eva Kendeova with Shagya

 • 3 minutes 3 seconds

67 - Poprad · Eva Kendeova (w. Shagya, restored #b)

67 – Poprad · Eva Kendeova (w. Shagya, restored #b)

 

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • Here I am 21 years old, at an equestrian competition in Poprad, Slovakia. I was representing my university’s equestrian club with my Arabian stud horse named Shagya. This was my last competition I took part in, because Taci did not like me pursuing a sport that was mostly in the company of men. Because of my love for him, I gave up the sport  •  Times have changed… Today the sport is mostly pursued by women. In a way, you can say that I was ahead of my time. By studying veterinary medicine, this was also considered a male’s profession, at that time.

 

• 1967 December 25 • Košice, Slovakia • Engagement Party • Dusil Brothers & Spouses

 • 3 minutes 54 seconds

67.Dec.25 - Kosice · Dusil & Kende family (Dusil brothers & spouses, restored)

67.Dec.25 – Kosice · Dusil & Kende family (Dusil brothers & spouses, restored)

 

• Standing, along the top row (left to right): Robert, Vaclav & Karol Dusil, sitting down are Zuzana Dusil, Eva Kendeova (not yet married), and Erika Dusil

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • This photo was taken at Taci’s and my engagement in my parents apartment in Kosice.

• Postscript from me • September 2014 • What my dad was about to do with his cup… I think I inherited some of that blood.

 

• 1967 December 25 • Košice, Slovakia • Engagement Party • Dusil & Kende Family

4 minutes 17 seconds

67.Dec.25 - Kosice · Dusil & Kende family (Engagement, restoration)

67.Dec.25 – Kosice · Dusil & Kende family (Engagement, restoration)

 

• Standing, along the top row (left to right): Robert Dusil, Csaba Kende, Erika Dusil, Karol Dusil, Eva Dusil, Vaclav Dusil, Anka Kendeova, Ladislav Kende, Attila Kende • Along the bottom row (left to right): Zuzana Dusil, Vera Kendeova, Stefan Kende, Valeria Kendeova, Robert Dusil sr.

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • Interesting, that on the left hangs the painting of “The Old Man”  that burned in the fire years later.  I have since painted it myself.  It hangs now in the hallway near the kitchen. My mother loved this painting and once when I visited, my Mom wanted to give it to me. I refused to take it, because said told me on a previous visit that as long as she lived she is not giving it away. I told my Mom to live for a long time, and enjoy the painting.

• Postscript from me • September 2014 • A rare photo with so many Kende and Dusil family members in one photo.  It was great to restore this one.  I love the odd composition of the photo, by capturing “The Old Man” painting so perfectly.

 

• 1970 • Košice, Slovakia • Stefan Kende, Valeria Kendeova

3 minutes 6 seconds

70 - Kosice · Stefan Kende, Valeria Kendeova (restored)

70 – Kosice · Stefan Kende, Valeria Kendeova (restored)

 

• Postscript from my Mom • September 2014 • This is a photo of my Mom and Dad, taken in Kosice, at their home on Krmanova 3, Kosice, shortly after we emigrated to Canada.


66 - Tatra · Eva Kendeova (restoration)

Martial Arts • Kickboxing at Tapout in Burlington, Ontario, Canada

14.Aug - Burlington, Tapout Kickboxing (title)

• Last month I was on vacation in Burlington, Ontario, Canada, and had the privilege of training with my sister, Alica, at the local TapouT MMA gym: Tapoutburlington.com.

• It was awesome to train beside my sister, and teach her a few things that I have learned over the years. Here is a video diary from our training sessions across five days. I can’t wait until we train together again! Love you, Ali :)

• I’d like to give a shout-out to my trainer in Prague, Karel Ferus.  If you live here, or are visiting Prague sometime in the future, feel free to come by and train with us.  If you are interested in strength and conditioning, cardio training, or want to learn how to fight, then come by.  If you want to train with us, then feel free to leave me a comment below, or visit these sites for more information:

Home - Signature, Gabriel Dusil ('12, shadow, teal)

 

 

 

 


14.Aug - Burlington, Tapout Kickboxing

 

OTT & Multiscreen • Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society • 7 • What improvements can OTT offer to Online Entertainment Services?

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (title)

• Video

• 9 minutes 44 seconds

7. What improvements can OTT offer to Online Entertainment Services?

With regards to improving OTT, there are four main features that will significantly improve the quality of online digital video services:

  • Content Accessibility
  • Content Upgradability
  • Content Portability
  • Subscriber Personalization

a. Entertainment Needs to be Accessible

Today’s digital society is migrating from an entertainment ownership paradigm to a licensing model. Past consumers typically bought hard copies of music and movies. Then they evolved to using the cloud for storage[i]. The main issue with ownership is that it is inherently inefficient from a global content management perspective. Millions of users own duplicate copies of their entertainment, which in turn amounts to millions of duplicate copies of the same song, movie, or TV program. For the environmentally sensitive, this needlessly adds to the amount of polymer, paper, and other harmful chemicals required to manufacture said copies, not to mention the wasted shelf space they take up in the home.

Extrapolating the idea that content in the future will mainly come in licensed form, it’s conceivable that once content resides in the cloud, those millions of duplicate copies will be rendered unnecessary. Imagine an OTT provider telling their subscribers:

“You no longer need to keep all of those files in the cloud.  We will delete your library and give you the best resolution and quality available for your purchased content. We will even allocate a license to members of your family. Furthermore, you can stream that content onto any device you own. We will format and deliver that content in the best quality possible, depending on the location, device, or network you happen to be using.”

That statement may not yet be feasible, but it offers a realistic vision of the future for OTT services. The licensing model will flip the entertainment industry’s current paradigm on its head. Rather than having millions of users accessing millions of duplicate versions of their entertainment, subscribers will simply license a single instance of that content, whenever and wherever they want. This is the essence of OTT.

13.Nov.20 - Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society (part vii, The ability to access content anytime, anywhere)

OTT services ultimately facilitate a single instance paradigmfor content. This approach has already begun. Consider Apple’s iTunes Match Service[iii] where users can upload their music library to the cloud. In fact, there is no need to upload music at all because the software recognizes that the subscriber has an instance of a song on their computer and grants them access to that song in the cloud. This same principle is possible for movies, TV shows, and any other type of entertainment content.

Practically speaking, one instance of a movie won’t happen in its purest form due to global delivery and caching requirements, archiving, competing services with the same title, etc. But theoretically it is possible have a single 4K or UHD[iv] master of a movie sitting in the cloud (Figure i). If a subscriber wants to access a movie, their content rights license is approved and granted for different devices or users. The movie would then be transcoded on the fly to suit the screen size, processor limitations, and networking capabilities. There are critical factors necessary to make this work, including: chipsets that can transcode 4K content on the fly, ubiquitous Internet access, bandwidth speeds that address quality of service, and seamless yet powerful DRM, to name just a few.

Figure i – Future of Content Delivery

Figure i – Future of Content Delivery

b. Entertainment Needs to be Upgradable

Once content resides in the cloud, such as in an OTT service, then the idea of an upgrade path is viable. Consumers today don’t upgrade their movies and music in the same manner as they upgrade software. Why not? If a user has a Blu-Ray version of a movie and buys a new 4K television, then why shouldn’t there be the possibility to upgrade to a better version? Consumers don’t want to buy content over and over again every time technology improves.

Likewise, when a new family member wants to access the family OTT service, there should be a content rights provision to accommodate that desire. When an extended or recut version is available, or a new featurette[v] is available, subscribers should have the option to pay an incremental fee for that content as well.

Simply put, entertainment should be upgradeable. With content residing in the cloud, OTT services can allow for this level of granularity. A cloud-based licensing model, therefore, provides the platform for upgradability in a manageable and scalable service.

c. Entertainment Needs to be Portable

Content needs to be protected in order to maintain a level of control over portability. Ultraviolet DRM is a solution that seeks to address this need, but true portability is still in its infancy. DRM and the broader scope of content protection is a delicate balance between control and freedom.  The digital locker offered by Ultraviolet seeks to provide a level of freedom for consumers, but can nevertheless feel like a digital prison sometimes.

Portability in the entertainment industry has been extended with the advent of multiple screens (TV, PC, and mobiles), but there are still improvements to be made. Content purchased on one platform (iOS, Android or Windows) should be available on other platforms. Content bought on disc should port to any digital screen owned by the purchaser. Content bought in one geographic region should be accessible internationally. Even movies enjoyed in the cinema could have agreements with OTT providers to find creative ways to offer theater releases in sync with online subscribers.

d. Entertainment Needs a Stellar User Experience

Subscribers want to have fun before, during, and after a movie. The more they have fun, the longer they will stay and play. The longer they stay, the more money they will spend.

This virtual playground is called the User Interface and User Experience (UI/UX) in OTT. It centers on social media, recommendation engines, trivia, games, and statistics, as well as many other features. It’s all about a bi-directional dialog and relationship with subscribers. The consumer is no longer an anonymous viewer to entertainment. Instead, the OTT service provider can facilitate a personal and engaging dialogue with each and every subscriber.

Word-of-mouth and advertising serves to promote head-end content, but does little to promote long-tail titles. With the massive libraries of some OTT services numbering in tens of thousands of titles, it’s quite likely subscribers are not taking advantage of all the content available to them as these libraries are simply too large to navigate. According to Netflix, their recommendation engine accounts for at least 75% of what is being viewed[vi]. A related study found that 14 percent more subscribers enjoy videos following a recommendation versus browsing[vii]. Using different metrics surrounding recommendation engines[viii],therefore,subscribers can migrate to undiscovered titles that are already residing in the service they paid for.

The UI/UX provides the interface to discover new content and allows content distributors to monetize long-tail material that sits dormant in libraries for most of its useful lifespan.

Finally, the value of social media in entertainment should not be underestimated. According to Ooyala, “Personal testimonials are one of the most powerful influences on all types of consumer action… By learning what their trusted friends have enjoyed, and by comparing that to their perception of how much they have in common with the recommender, viewers get a very personalized and motivating impression of what to check out.”[ix]

Clearly, recommendation engines help consumers reach the heretofore uncharted depths of large entertainment libraries.

 


[i] “Turning Piratez into Consumers, II”, by Gabriel Dusil, http://gdusil.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/turning-piratez-into-consumers-ii/

[ii] “The ability to access content anytime, anywhere and on any screen is the essence of today‘s OTT multiscreen strategy.”

[iii] Apple’s iTunes Match Service http://www.apple.com/itunes/itunes-match/

[iv] 4K UHD, Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4K_resolution

[v] Featurette, Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Featurette

[vi] “Science Behind the Netflix Algorithms That Decide What You’ll Watch Next”, by Tom Vanderbilt, 7th August 2013, Wired.com http://www.wired.com/2013/08/qq_netflix-algorithm/

[vii] “Branded Videos Shared More Than 500,000 Times Every 24 Hours”, by Greg Jarboe, 11th June 2013 http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2273968/Branded-Videos-Shared-More-Than-500000-Times-Every-24-Hours

[viii] For example: rating systems, social networking, “Likes”, shares, and chat statistics, viewing guides, promotion through syndication, past behavior, demographics ofusers with common interests

[ix] “Connecting Consumers with Content”, Ooyala http://go.ooyala.com/rs/OOYALA/images/ooyala-content-discovery-whitepaper.pdf

.

• Entertainment Challenges in Today’s Digital Society

•Ÿ  Check out additional thought leadership answers to the entertainment challenges in today’s digital society:

1. Is 2nd Screen a threat to broadcasters? What are the challenges for OTT moving forward?

http://gdusil.wordpress.com/2013/12/24/entertainment-challenges-in-todays-digital-society-i-of-vii/

2. How will 4K be adopted by consumers?

http://gdusil.wordpress.com/2014/01/13/entertainment-challenges-in-todays-digital-society-ii-of-vii/

3. Is there a future for 4K video in broadcast?

http://gdusil.wordpress.com/2014/02/10/entertainment-challenges-in-todays-digital-society-iii-of-vii/

4. How is OTT evolving, and what’s in store for subscribers?

http://gdusil.wordpress.com/2014/02/26/entertainment-challenges-in-todays-digital-society-iv-of-vii/

5. How is digital video affecting global communications?

http://gdusil.wordpress.com/2014/03/27/entertainment-challenges-in-todays-digital-society-v-of-vii/

• Synopsis

•  Understanding the entertainment market from ten thousand meters helps industry executives make strategic decisions. This leads to tactical initiatives that drive innovation, new services, and revenue growth. This Q&A series takes a top level view of today’s digital landscape and helps decision makers navigate through the latest technologies and trends in digital video. Gabriel Dusil, Chief Marketing & Corporate Strategy Officer from Visual Unity, discusses the ongoing developments in Over the Top (OTT) services, how these platforms are helping to shape today’s digital society, and addresses the evolving changes in consumer behavior. Topics include 2nd Screen, 4K Ultra High Definition video, H.265 HEVC, global challenges surrounding content distribution, and the future of OTT.

• About Gabriel Dusil

Home - Signature, Gabriel Dusil ('12, shadow, orange)

Gabriel Dusil is the Chief Marketing and Corporate Strategy Officer at Visual Unity, with a mandate to advance the company’s portfolio into next generation solutions and expand the company’s global presence. Before joining Visual Unity, Gabriel was the VP of Sales & Marketing at Cognitive Security, and Director of Alliances at SecureWorks, responsible for partners in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA). Previously, Gabriel worked at VeriSign and Motorola in a combination of senior marketing and sales roles. Gabriel obtained a degree in Engineering Physics from McMaster University in Canada and has advanced knowledge in Online Video Solutions, Cloud Computing, Security as a Service (SaaS), Identity and Access Management (IAM), and Managed Security Services (MSS).

• Tags

• 2nd Screen, 4K, Broadcast, Connected TV, Digital Rights, Digital Video, DRM, Gabriel Dusil, H.264, H.265, HEVC, Internet Video, Linear Broadcast, Linear TV, Multi-screen, Multiscreen, New Media, Online Video, Online Video Platform, OTT, Over the Top Content, OVP, Recommendation Engine, Search Discovery, second screen, Smart TV, Social TV, TV Anywhere, TV Everywhere, UHD, Ultra HD, Ultra High Definition, Visual Unity

OTT & Multiscreen • Web Seminar • 7 • An ROI Case Study for Video Streaming

14.May.27 - Visual Unity Global (training, title)

• Web Seminar ’14 • #7 • An ROI Case Study for Video Streaming

• Welcome to our seventh web seminar from our ’14 series.  This presentation is also the third part of our “Getting your ROI from Video Streaming series” web seminar, that we held at the end of July 2014.

• ŸCheck out other white papers, video presentations, and opinion pieces from my blog “Digital Video for a Digital Generation”: www.dusil.com

• ŸInvesting in video streaming services requires a solid understanding of the Return on Investment (ROI) for such a platform. In this presentation we breakdown the value proposition of Over the Top content (OTT) platforms, used to generate new revenue streams from entertainment assets.  Understanding ROI, requires a breakdown of cost savings, new revenue streams, feature enhancements, and other intangible benefits. This web seminar looks into various aspects of content management, delivery and consumption, and how cloud-based services such as OTT not only generates new revenue streams, but also opens new doors to monetize entertainment libraries.

• Video Presentation

• 8 minutes 18 seconds

• Download the Native PowerPoint Slides

14.Jul.31 – Visual Unity Global (training, #7, ROI Case Study for Video Streaming).pptx

• View the PDF version on slideshare.net

• Tags

ŸFear Uncertainty Doubt, 2nd Screen, Broadcast, Connected TV, Digital Rights, Digital Video, DRM, Gabriel Dusil, Internet Video, Linear Broadcast, Linear TV, Multi + screen, Multiscreen, Online Video Platform, OTT, Over the Top Content, OVP, Recommendation Engine, Search + Discovery, second screen, Smart TV, Social TV, Television, TV Everywhere, Video Streaming, Visual Unity Global, Return On Investment, ROI, Total Cost of Ownership, TCO

OTT & Multiscreen • Web Seminar • 6 • Getting Your ROI from Video Streaming

14.May.27 - Visual Unity Global (training, title)

• Web Seminar ’14 • #6 • Getting Your ROI from Video Streaming

• Welcome to the sixth web seminar from our ’14 series.  This presentation is the second of three, of our “Getting your ROI from Video Streaming series” web seminar, held at the end of July 2014.

• ŸCheck out other white papers, video presentations, and opinion pieces from my blog “Digital Video for a Digital Generation”: www.dusil.com

• ŸInvesting in video streaming services requires a solid understanding of the Return on Investment (ROI) for such a platform. In this presentation we breakdown the value proposition of Over the Top content (OTT) platforms, used to generate new revenue streams from entertainment assets.  Understanding ROI, requires a breakdown of cost savings, new revenue streams, feature enhancements, and other intangible benefits. This web seminar looks into various aspects of content management, delivery and consumption, and how cloud-based services such as OTT not only generates new revenue streams, but also opens new doors to monetize entertainment libraries.

• Video Presentation

• 14 minutes 15 seconds

• Download the Native PowerPoint Slides

14.Jul.31 – Visual Unity Global (training, #6, Getting Your ROI from Video Streaming).pptx

• View the PDF version on slideshare.net

• Tags

ŸFear Uncertainty Doubt, 2nd Screen, Broadcast, Connected TV, Digital Rights, Digital Video, DRM, Gabriel Dusil, Internet Video, Linear Broadcast, Linear TV, Multi + screen, Multiscreen, Online Video Platform, OTT, Over the Top Content, OVP, Recommendation Engine, Search + Discovery, second screen, Smart TV, Social TV, Television, TV Everywhere, Video Streaming, Visual Unity Global, Return On Investment, ROI, Total Cost of Ownership, TCO

OTT & Multiscreen • Web Seminar • 5 • Defining ROI & TCO for Video Streaming

14.May.27 - Visual Unity Global (training, title)

• Web Seminar ’14 • #5 • Defining ROI & TCO for Video Streaming

• We are proud to present to you our fifth web seminar from our ’14 series.   This edition to the series is the first of three presentations from our “Getting your ROI from Video Streaming series” web seminar, held at the end of July 2014.

• ŸCheck out other white papers, video presentations, and opinion pieces from my blog “Digital Video for a Digital Generation”: www.dusil.com

• ŸInvesting in video streaming services requires a solid understanding of the Return on Investment (ROI) for such a platform. In this presentation we breakdown the value proposition of Over the Top content (OTT) platforms, used to generate new revenue streams from entertainment assets.  Understanding ROI, requires a breakdown of cost savings, new revenue streams, feature enhancements, and other intangible benefits. This web seminar looks into various aspects of content management, delivery and consumption, and how cloud-based services such as OTT not only generates new revenue streams, but also opens new doors to monetize entertainment libraries.

• Video Presentation

• 16 minutes 14 seconds

• Download the Native PowerPoint Slides

14.Jul.31 – Visual Unity Global (training, #5, Defining ROI for Video Streaming).pptx

• View the PDF version on slideshare.net

• Tags

ŸFear Uncertainty Doubt, 2nd Screen, Broadcast, Connected TV, Digital Rights, Digital Video, DRM, Gabriel Dusil, Internet Video, Linear Broadcast, Linear TV, Multi + screen, Multiscreen, Online Video Platform, OTT, Over the Top Content, OVP, Recommendation Engine, Search + Discovery, second screen, Smart TV, Social TV, Television, TV Everywhere, Video Streaming, Visual Unity Global, Return On Investment, ROI, Total Cost of Ownership, TCO

Blog Stats

  • 9,546 hits

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 221 other followers

Profile

gdusil

gdusil

Gabriel Dusil is currently the Chief Marketing & Corporate Strategy Officer at Visual Unity, with a mandate to help expand the company's global presence. Before joining Visual Unity, Gabriel was the VP of Sales & Marketing at Cognitive Security, and Director of Alliances at SecureWorks, responsible for partners in Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA). Previously, Gabriel worked at VeriSign & Motorola in a combination of senior marketing & sales roles. Gabriel obtained a degree in Engineering Physics from McMaster University, in Canada and has advanced knowledge in Cloud Computing, SaaS (Security as a Service), Identity & Access Management (IAM), and Managed Security Services (MSS).

Personal Links

Verified Services

View Full Profile →

October 2014
S M T W T F S
« Sep    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 221 other followers

%d bloggers like this: