Adel ▲ Opinion ▲ 18 ▲ Borderless Citizens™ in the 21st Century ▲ Defining Borders

Abstract

Thanks to the Internet and more recently, blockchain technology, the world is waking up to a political, economic, social and technological renaissance. The next two decades will result in a fundamental shift in human interaction, sharing, and freedom. All aspects of vertical and horizontal markets will be affected, including Finance & Banking, Healthcare, eGovernment, Communications, Information Technology (IT) and the Internet of things (IoT).

This series is presented in three parts and will analyze society’s paradigm shift in behavior and present a vision for the future. In this first part, the creation of virtual communities is explored, fueled by blockchain innovation and explores the evolution of the crypto sphere.

Defining Borders

Before exploring the evolutionary changes of cyberspace in our social fabric, let’s first understand how we got here. Let’s begin with society’s tendency to erect borders. Some borders are physical, such as land and sea, but others are less obvious. Governments establish political borders to separate enemies from their allies. They restrict the flow of people through passports, visas, and border controls. States use utilities as borders, restricting the use of gas, water, electricity, or even telecommunications.

While these borders control cross-regional competition they also restrict citizens to fewer options. Less obvious are cultural barriers such as language and religion. There are economic borders limiting the street-use of one country’s fiat currency[i] abroad. There are less tangible examples, such as left vs. right side car steering wheels[ii] and metric vs. imperial measurements[iii]. The commercial industry also chimes in with broadcast signal restrictions (PAL vs. NTSC video standards[iv]), and 120V vs. 220V electricity[v]. Some of these borders exist due to localized evolution, but it’s hard to ignore the political motivations of their origin.

Borderless

Even though society tends to erect borders, many actors want to break them down. Initiatives across multiple disciplines are driven by a goal to unify the world. It’s hard to ignore that many of these entries were established in the aftermath of World War I or II, in an effort to learn from the tragedies of our past. Regardless, the effort is ongoing:

  • In 1993 the European Union[vi] (EU) was established to unify the economic zones of member states. A global initiative has yet to be attempted.
  • The Schengen agreement[vii] came into effect in 1995 (named after the city where it was signed), allowing citizens to freely cross certain borders in Europe.
  • North American Free Trade Agreement[viii] (NAFTA, est. 1994) created a trilateral trade bloc in North America.
  • North Atlantic Treaty Organization[ix] (NATO) was formed in 1949, establishing a “collective defense” to ensure the atrocities of World War I and II would not be repeated.
  • The United Nations (UN) was formed in 1945 “to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order” [x].
  • International Court of Justice[xi] (ICJ, est. 1945) settles legal disputes between member states.
  • International Monetary Fund[xii] (IMF, est. 1945) was established to facilitate international trade, sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world
  • European Space Agency[xiii] (ESA, est. 1975) consists of twenty-two-member states dedicated to the exploration of space.
  • Various cross-border humanitarian initiatives were established throughout the 20th century, such as:
  • The World Health Organization (WHO, est. 1948) mandates the “attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health”[xiv]
  • Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO, est. 1945) “is charged with collecting, evaluating, and disseminating information relating to nutrition” [xv]
  • Unicef[xvi] (est. 1946) mandated by the United Nations General Assembly for the protection of children’s rights
  • The International Labour Organization (est. 1919) is “devoted to promoting social justice and internationally recognized human and labor rights”. [xvii]
  • The borderless movement is also part of international standards initiatives, such as:
  • International Telecommunication Union[xviii] (ITU, est. 1865), is one of the oldest intergovernmental organizations in the world. The ITU allocates global radio spectrum, satellite orbits and ratifies international technical standards.
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers[xix] (IEEE, est. 1963), directed toward the advancement of the theory and practice of electrical, electronics, communications, and computing.
  • Internet Engineering Task Force[xx] (IETF, est. 1986) defines Internet operating protocol standards.
  • General Public License[xxi] (GPL, or GNU GPL, GNU’s Not Unix! GPL, written by Richard Stallman in 1989) is intended to ensure the freedom to share and improve software for all users.
  • International Organization for Standardization[xxii] (ISO, est. 1947), with a mission to promote worldwide proprietary, industrial and commercial standards.
  • Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN[xxiii], est. 1998) is a non-profit organization with a goal to ensure a smooth functioning Internet.

Borders are integral to our lives. Technology has helped remove many of them, but some will perpetually exist, such as culture and religion. One of the main catalysts of the borderless movement has been technology and the Internet in particular. The internet brought transparency to the world, and this has led to an awareness of various social, political, and economic levels.

▲ Adel ▲ Opinions

If you liked this article and would like to read more in the series, then check them out here:

▲ 1 ▲ The Right Path to Funding Decentralized Organizations

▲ 2 ▲ The Next Evolution in Funding Innovation

▲ 3 ▲ A Philosophy for Blockchain Integrity

▲ 4 ▲ A Collaborative Blockchain Incubator

▲ 5 ▲ Blockchain Diversity & Passion

▲ 6 ▲ Blockchain Startup Expertise

▲ 7 ▲ Blockchain Portfolio Diversification

▲ 8 ▲ Blockchain Incubation to Employment

▲ 9 ▲ From Blockchain Innovation to Execution

▲ 10 ▲ Blockchain Will Transform Retail Lending

▲ 11 ▲ The Next Evolution in Crypto Trading

▲ 12 ▲ Crypto Trading for Everyone

▲ 13 ▲ Architecting Crypto Financial Instruments

▲ 14 ▲ Crypto, For the People, By the People

▲ 15 ▲ The Crypto Uprising

▲ 16 ▲ Blockchain’s Disruption in 2020 & Beyond

About the Author

Gabriel is the co-Founder and General Manager at Adel Ecosystem Ltd. He is a seasoned sales and marketing expert with over 25 years in senior positions at Motorola, VeriSign (acquired by Symantec in 2010), and SecureWorks (acquired by Dell in 2011), and Cognitive Security (acquired by Cisco in 2013). He is a blockchain entrepreneur, with strengths in international business strategy. Gabriel has a bachelor’s degree in Engineering Physics from McMaster University in Canada and expert knowledge in blockchain incubation, cloud computing, IT security, and video streaming, and Over the Top Content (OTT). Gabriel also runs his own company, Euro Tech Startups s.r.o, creator of MyKoddi, and manages a professional blog.

References

[i] “Fiat Money” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiat_money)

[ii] ” Trivia about driving on the left” (World Standards, https://www.worldstandards.eu/cars/trivia-about-driving-left/)

[iii] ”Imperial vs. Metric System” (Interchange, https://www.interexchange.org/articles/career-training-usa/2012/05/24/imperial-vs-metric-system/

[iv] ”NTSC vs. PAL” (Diffen, https://www.diffen.com/difference/NTSC_vs_PAL

[v] Dhawal D, “Why does UK/USA use 110/120V and others use 220/240V” (The DNetworks, http://thednetworks.com/2012/06/10/why-does-ukusa-use-110120v-and-others-use-220240v/)

[vi] ”History of the European Union” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_European_Union

[vii] ”Schengen Agreement” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Agreement

[viii] ”North American Free Trade Agreement” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_Free_Trade_Agreement

[ix] ”NATO” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO

[x] ”United Nations” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations)

[xi] “International Court of Justice” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Court_of_Justice)

[xii] ”International Monetary Fund” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Monetary_Fund)

[xiii] ”European Space Agency” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Space_Agency)

[xiv] ”World Health Organization” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Health_Organization)

[xv] ”Food and Agriculture Organization” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_and_Agriculture_Organization)

[xvi] ”UNICEF” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNICEF)

[xvii] ”International Labour Organization” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Labour_Organization)

[xviii] ”International Telecommunication Union” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Telecommunication_Union)

[xix] ”Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institute_of_Electrical_and_Electronics_Engineers)

[xx] ”Internet Engineering Task Force” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Engineering_Task_Force)

[xxi] ”GNU General Public License” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_General_Public_License)

[xxii] ”International Organization for Standardization” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Organization_for_Standardization)

[xxiii] ”ICANN” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICANN)

Adel ▲ Opinion ▲ 17 ▲ Borderless Citizens™ in the 21st Century ▲ Introduction

Abstract

Thanks to the Internet and more recently, blockchain technology, the world is waking up to a political, economic, social and technological renaissance. The next two decades will result in a fundamental shift in human interaction, sharing, and freedom. All aspects of vertical and horizontal markets will be affected, including Finance & Banking, Healthcare, eGovernment, Communications, Information Technology (IT) and the Internet of things (IoT).

This series is presented in three parts and will analyze society’s paradigm shift in behavior and present a vision for the future. In this first part, the creation of virtual communities is explored, fueled by blockchain innovation and explores the evolution of the crypto sphere.

Introduction

Some inventions are taken for granted as if destined to be. New paradigms are woven into the fabric of our lives so nuanced that we forgo the lineage of its development. The internet is a classic example, where baby boomers[i] and generation-x[ii] reflect on a time when the Internet wasn’t even part of their vocabulary. We had questions, but nowhere to find answers. Our queries fade, and we moved on. Millennials now say, “OK Google” “Siri” or “Alexa” and get answers, with a side of dopamine. It has taken a few decades, but the internet has broken down the borders to information flow. Now the cyber-generation is taking their next steps in the global dissemination of content.

The introduction of blockchain and cryptocurrency is a culmination of social trends that favor open-source systems over proprietary systems, freedom over suppression, and privacy in place of monitoring. Before discussing blockchain let’s first bring Bitcoin to the forefront. Similar to email being the first application of the Internet, bitcoin was the first application of blockchain. In hindsight, it seems that the two were introduced in the wrong order, but it was rather clever because a useful application was immediately introduced to highlight the resilience of the infrastructure. The alternative would have been creating blockchain first and hoping the world would figure out how to use it. That may have also worked but may have taken longer. The potential of blockchain has now been recognized as transformational in practically every industry. Bitcoin and blockchain have not only brought on an evolutionary but a revolutionary paradigm in how our society behaves.

“What was once extraordinary, soon becomes normal.”

The internet was a disruptive force for many industries over the past few decades. Millennials[iii] are oblivious to paying for long-distance phone calls, waiting weeks to get a response to their letter, or the 74 minute limit of CDs. Throughout the ’90s and ’00s, the internet disrupted just about every industry in the world, including entertainment, computing, and communications. But no one dared to disrupt the finance industry until 2008 when the alias known as Satoshi Nakamoto[iv] wrote the white paper, “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System”. It may have taken several years for the world to notice, but this challenge, “the religion of money”[v] controlled by centralized powers of a “monetary system [that] has its own intrinsic logic of growth”[vi]. Bitcoin set in motion a complete disruption of financial markets and introduced what is now known as “virtual currency”[vii] or “cryptocurrency”[viii]. Nakamoto arguably made a significant dent in just ten years of its inception, introducing financial services that are modified to utilize the crypto ideology.

At the Gettysburg address, on November 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln closed by saying “- and that government, of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth”. It is poignant to reference these words in today’s changing the world. For the first time in history, the world has a virtual currency that was created by the people, for the people, and of the people. A currency not controlled by a central power and lives autonomously and free in cyberspace.

With blockchain considered as the biggest invention since the Internet, what’s next? How is society changing because of bitcoin, and what is expected from its underlying technology? Which areas in our social-economic behavior will change due to this new technology and how will this affect the lives of our children’s children?

▲ Adel ▲ Opinions

If you liked this article and would like to read more in the series, then check them out here:

▲ 1 ▲ The Right Path to Funding Decentralized Organizations

▲ 2 ▲ The Next Evolution in Funding Innovation

▲ 3 ▲ A Philosophy for Blockchain Integrity

▲ 4 ▲ A Collaborative Blockchain Incubator

▲ 5 ▲ Blockchain Diversity & Passion

▲ 6 ▲ Blockchain Startup Expertise

▲ 7 ▲ Blockchain Portfolio Diversification

▲ 8 ▲ Blockchain Incubation to Employment

▲ 9 ▲ From Blockchain Innovation to Execution

▲ 10 ▲ Blockchain Will Transform Retail Lending

▲ 11 ▲ The Next Evolution in Crypto Trading

▲ 12 ▲ Crypto Trading for Everyone

▲ 13 ▲ Architecting Crypto Financial Instruments

▲ 14 ▲ Crypto, For the People, By the People

▲ 15 ▲ The Crypto Uprising

▲ 16 ▲ Blockchain’s Disruption in 2020 & Beyond

About the Author

Gabriel is the co-Founder and General Manager at Adel Ecosystem Ltd. He is a seasoned sales and marketing expert with over 25 years in senior positions at Motorola, VeriSign (acquired by Symantec in 2010), and SecureWorks (acquired by Dell in 2011), and Cognitive Security (acquired by Cisco in 2013). He is a blockchain entrepreneur, with strengths in international business strategy. Gabriel has a bachelor’s degree in Engineering Physics from McMaster University in Canada and expert knowledge in blockchain incubation, cloud computing, IT security, and video streaming, and Over the Top Content (OTT). Gabriel also runs his own company, Euro Tech Startups s.r.o, creator of MyKoddi, and manages a professional blog.

References

[i] “Baby Boomers” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_boomers

[ii] ”Generation_X” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_X

[iii] ”Millennials” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millennials

[iv] ”Satoshi Nakamoto” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satoshi_Nakamoto

[v] Stratford Caldecott, “The Religion of Money” (March 26, 2012, http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2012/03/religion-of-money.html)

[vi] Philip Goodchild, “On his book Theology of Money” (Rorotoko, November 30, 2009, http://rorotoko.com/interview/20091130_goodchiled_philip_on_theology_of_money/?page=2)

[vii] “Virtual Currency” (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_currency)

[viii] “Crypto Currency (Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency)